Gastronomy

    • Fourcès marché aux fleurs

    Built around a castle which has today been replaced by a tree-shaded square, Fourcès is an original "bastide" with a circular ground plan whose houses form a dramatic setting of half-timbering and arcades. In addition to some must-taste gastronomic delights of this Gascon land, the village also attracts visitors with several key events such as its Flower Market in April or "Marciac in Fourcès" an extract from the now famous jazz festival.

    Themes

    • By the waterside : The river Auzoue
    • Castles and ramparts : Porte de l’Horloge (west gate in the Clock Tower), the castle (hotel-restaurant) (Châteaux et remparts)
    • Gastronomy : Armagnac, foie gras, duck breast and confits
    • Wine : AOC Côtes de Gascogne wines

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    • Hell-Bourg guétaly

    In superb scenery formed by the Cirque de Salazie and its lush vegetation, the architecture of Hell-Bourg is a combination of Creole features and Belle Epoque heritage stemming from its former glory as a spa.

    Themes

    • Gastronomy : Trout (fish-breeding farm)
    • Panoramas : Cirque de Salazie

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    • la Flotte port et bateaux

    A pretty little fishing and yachting port ! With its rounded, 200m-long jetty built in 1840, La Flotte lives in tune with the comings and goings of the boats that enliven the quays all year round. Inside, the peaceful, flower-decked streets line up their low-roofed houses whose sparklingly white walls provide a luminous background to the green or blue shutters

    Themes

    • By the waterside : Atlantic Ocean
    • Gastronomy : Oysters, Pineau fortified wine and sea salt
    • Unusual sights : Fort de la Prée

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    • Larressingle entrée du village

    The walls of Larressingle rise up amid the vineyards in Armagnac country, just a short distance from Condom. The ochre and grey stone houses still with their mullioned windows and arched doorways are clustered around the castle keep and its twin-nave church. This is an ideal spot to appreciate not only the charm but also the food of the Gers.

    Themes

    • Abbeys and churches : Church of Saint Sigismond
    • By the waterside : The river Baïse
    • Gastronomy : Armagnac, floc, foie gras, etc.

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  • Perched above the valleys and hills of Quercy Blanc, this fortified village founded in the 12C by the Count of Toulouse is on the "via Podiensis", one of the pilgrimage routes to Santiago de Compostela. Many traces of its historical and religious past still remain intact : the main square and its cobblestones, stone-built or half-timbered houses, and the pilgrim’s garden to name but a few

    Themes

    • Gastronomy : Lauzerte macaroon, AOC Chasselas grapes, fruit and duck products
    • Panoramas : View of Quercy Blanc valleys
    • Unusual sights : The square surrounded by an arcade with its raised paving in one corner
    • Wine : Coteaux du Quercy wines

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  • Les Baux-de-Provence lies perched like an eagle’s nest in the heart of the Alpilles and is a must-see place in Provence which artists, craftspeople and makers of local produce keep alive all year round.

    Themes

    • Castles and ramparts : Les Baux Castle
    • Gastronomy : AOC olive oil from the Valley of Les Baux
    • Unusual sights : Carrières de Lumière 
    • Panoramas : Les Alpilles scenery
    • Wine : AOC Baux-de-Provence wines

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  • Locronan gets its name from Saint Ronan, the hermit who founded the town in the 10C. It reached its peak in the 16C thanks to the sailcloth industry, with one of the biggest customers being the East India Company. The granite village has been wonderfully preserved and still has very fine Renaissance houses and a magnificent 15C church.

    Themes

    • Abbeys and churches : Church of Saint Ronan, Pénity and Notre Dame de Bonne Nouvelle Chapels
    • Gastronomy : Kouign-amann (puff pastry gateau made with butter and sugar), savoury pancakes
    • Panoramas : sight from Locronan's Mountain (Plas Ar Horn)

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  • Mirmande’s houses lie hidden behind the village walls and are intertwined in a maze of alleyways ; they still retain their beautiful stone facades and old doors. After the disappearance of silkworm farming in the late 19C, fruit growing ensured Mirmande’s growth and fame as did the celebrities who stayed here : the painter André Lhote lived here and French geologist Haroun Tazieff was the mayor from 1979 to 1989.

    Themes

    • Abbeys and churches : Church of Sainte Foy
    • Castles and ramparts : The ramparts
    • Gastronomy : Fruit juice, fruit and seasonal vegetables
    • Panoramas : View of the Rhône valley and the Vivarais Mountains from Sainte Foy

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  • Monpazier is labelled a "Grand site national", it has no less than 32 listed buildings and is regarded as the prime example of a "bastide" among the 300 in South-western France. Monpazier has had countless awards to salute, but also to protect, the outstanding heritage of this fortified village that was founded by Edward I of England in 1284.

    Themes

    • Gastronomy : The Cèpe mushroom market every afternoon from August to October (depending on growth)
    • Unusual sights : The main square with arcade

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  • Built in 1255 on a rocky spur bypassed by the River Auzoue, Montréal was the first Gascon “bastide”. The streets are laid out on a grid pattern and lead to the main square with an arcade and half-timbered houses from where visitors can discover the gothic church which is partly fortified. On the neighbouring hill of Séviac, the 4C villa paved with more than thirty multi-coloured mosaic tilings serves as a reminder that the village was built on a former Gallo-Roman site.

    Themes

    • Gastronomy : Armagnac and floc (fortified wine made with Armagnac), croustade (apples in filo pastry)

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